Did you start pursuing a goal in 2012, but you quit or dropped out?
Would you like to know 1 critical key to sticking with it in 2013?

If so, read on – today’s message is for you..

This morning I started reading “Do the Work” a short book by Steven
Pressfield (of War of Art fame). After reading only the first chapter,
something leaped out at me which I knew I wanted to share with you.

Pressfield said,

“Once we commit to action, the worst thing we can do is stop.”

Agreed! And yet that’s what most people do – they set a goal,
commit to action and within weeks, they are dropouts.

The question is, what can we do about this – and especially right now, as
the new year is approaching, with new goals and dreams along with it?

Pressfield offered one suggestion:

“What will keep us from stopping? Plain old stubbornness.”

He went on to talk about “being stubborn” as a virtue because it’s less
lofty than’”tenacity’ or ‘perseverance.’ “We don’t have to be heroes to be
stubborn. We can just be pains in the butt.”

I nodded my head as I continued reading…

“When we’re stubborn, there’s no quit in us. We’re mean. We’re mulish.
We’re ornery…

WE’RE IN TIL THE FINISH…

We will sink our junkyard-dog teeth into resistance’s ass and not let go,
no matter how hard he kicks.”

By this point, I was grinning from ear to ear, because this very subject had
been on my mind, as I had just finished posting another success story article
from one of our Burn the Fat Challenge champions.

It’s about a guy had set a goal, committed to action and quit twice before. But the
3rd time was the charm for him, because he did something different this time.

Once you commit to action, the worst thing you can do is stop. Or, as that
meme that has been circulating around facebook goes…

“If you’re tired of starting over, stop quitting.”

Hi there!My name is Ward Hayward, and I survived an open heart double bypass operation, with a vascular accident (Major stroke), on the side just to make things interesting. This happened November 16, 2006, so I have been recovering for 6 years now.As the headline says, I’m Lucky To Be Here!

Anyway, I was in the hospital for three months; two months at the Ottawa Heart Institute, and 3 weeks at St Vincent’s long term care facility. I was in an induced coma for the first month.

How did I survive this life changing event? one word. Prayer! My wife Claire ( we have been together 20 years) was at my bedside every single day, praying for me. My parents and brother came almost as often, as did my close friends. They all prayed for a miracle, and to be honest I guess that’s what it was. The first day, when the doctor came out, he told Claire, and my brother Gord, that I had a 10% chance of living through the night.They even had a priest brought in and gave me my last rites…

The next three months were a complete nightmare. My chest was open for two weeks, due to infections. There were 21 lines attached to my body. All that I can remember is the dreams.Long dreams…. I can’t really say I enjoyed them, but having nothing else to do, and I mean nothing, I made the most of them. Strange situations, long conversations, they got stranger and more bizarre as time went by.

It turns out that while I was completely lost in my own strange world, my real body was so energetic that I had to be restrained at all times. This was reflected in my dreams. I was always tied to my bed, so I was always trying to get out of it. So I ended up in weird day long dreams of me trying desperately to get free, having imaginary conversations with my nurses.

Once I regained consciousness, things just got worse. I was fed intravenously, so no eating, no water. I pulled my feeding tube out 28 times. Now I started dreaming about water, begging anyone who came close, in sign language,for water. These were the most crazy dreams. Good times!

As I said at the start, my girlfriend of 20 years, Claire, was at my side every day that I was in the hospital. She was there at least 8 hours a day, every day, squeezing my hand, saying prayers. The doctors said I had little hope at first, but she would get angry and tell them no one knew when god decided to take someone, and kept praying. By the way, she kept a diary of every thing that happened, which I will share with you a little later. My parents also wrote many emails, detailing my progress, or lack thereof. These still make me very emotional when I read them, and I will share them as well.

So, that is some insight to my story. But the story began months before I landed in the hospital. My operation was on November 16,2006. My first heart attack was on July 3, however. I was 42 years old,, and we had just spent Canada Day weekend on the Byward market. We decided to take it easy on Monday, and I remember having tomato soup with rigatoni and cheese for lunch. The next thing I knew,I had a massive headache. I started sweating badly, and began vomiting over and over. My girlfriend freaked and I called my best friend, Eugene, and told him I was in real trouble. He made it from Orleans to Vanier in less than 20 minutes and we were in emergency in 10. I thought it was food poisoning at first. Remember, I was 42 years old. No 42 year old has a heart attack , right? Wrong… The hospital just happened to have a young doctor on staff who was on loan from Quebec City. He informed I was having a major heart attack right that minute!

It was decided that I would have an angioplasty done, which is pretty common nowadays, but when they started the doctors discovered that my arteries were comletely blocked, and decided I needed more tests done. Of course the hospital was full, so We had to wait . For a week ! I had discovered by now that hospitals suck. I was informed that I would need open heart surgery but would have to wait. The hospital sent me home and put me on warfarin (rat poison), which is a blood thinner given to heart patients all the time. So, I waited. and waited. For 3 months.

On the night of november 15 I went to bed with a sore stomach. The cramps just got worse and worse. Finally, at 4 am I had enough and called 911. In hindsight that was my big mistake! Turns out you have to be off warfarin for at least a week before major surgery. Major faux pas. As in bad idea…the doctors later apologized. Okay, enough for now. Stay tuned for chapter two, I will show you Claire’s diary, and my parents’ emails.

Hi there!My name is Ward Hayward, and I survived an open heart double bypass operation, with a vascular accident (Major stroke), on the side just to make things interesting. This happened November 16, 2006, so I have been recovering for 6 years now.As the headline says, I’m Lucky To Be Here!

Anyway, I was in the hospital for three months; two months at the Ottawa Heart Institute, and 3 weeks at St Vincent’s long term care facility. I was in an induced coma for the first month.

How did I survive this life changing event? one word. Prayer! My wife Claire ( we have been together 20 years) was at my bedside every single day, praying for me. My parents and brother came almost as often, as did my close friends. They all prayed for a miracle, and to be honest I guess that’s what it was. The first day, when the doctor came out, he told Claire, and my brother Gord, that I had a 10% chance of living through the night.They even had a priest brought in and gave me my last rites…

The next three months were a complete nightmare. My chest was open for two weeks, due to infections. There were 21 lines attached to my body. All that I can remember is the dreams.Long dreams…. I can’t really say I enjoyed them, but having nothing else to do, and I mean nothing, I made the most of them. Strange situations, long conversations, they got stranger and more bizarre as time went by.

It turns out that while I was completely lost in my own strange world, my real body was so energetic that I had to be restrained at all times. This was reflected in my dreams. I was always tied to my bed, so I was always trying to get out of it. So I ended up in weird day long dreams of me trying desperately to get free, having imaginary conversations with my nurses.

Once I regained consciousness, things just got worse. I was fed intravenously, so no eating, no water. I pulled my feeding tube out 28 times. Now I started dreaming about water, begging anyone who came close, in sign language,for water. These were the most crazy dreams. Good times!

As I said at the start, my girlfriend of 20 years, Claire, was at my side every day that I was in the hospital. She was there at least 8 hours a day, every day, squeezing my hand, saying prayers. The doctors said I had little hope at first, but she would get angry and tell them no one knew when god decided to take someone, and kept praying. By the way, she kept a diary of every thing that happened, which I will share with you a little later. My parents also wrote many emails, detailing my progress, or lack thereof. These still make me very emotional when I read them, and I will share them as well.

So, that is some insight to my story. But the story began months before I landed in the hospital. My operation was on November 16,2006. My first heart attack was on July 3, however. I was 42 years old,, and we had just spent Canada Day weekend on the Byward market. We decided to take it easy on Monday, and I remember having tomato soup with rigatoni and cheese for lunch. The next thing I knew,I had a massive headache. I started sweating badly, and began vomiting over and over. My girlfriend freaked and I called my best friend, Eugene, and told him I was in real trouble. He made it from Orleans to Vanier in less than 20 minutes and we were in emergency in 10. I thought it was food poisoning at first. Remember, I was 42 years old. No 42 year old has a heart attack , right? Wrong… The hospital just happened to have a young doctor on staff who was on loan from Quebec City. He informed I was having a major heart attack right that minute!

It was decided that I would have an angioplasty done, which is pretty common nowadays, but when they started the doctors discovered that my arteries were comletely blocked, and decided I needed more tests done. Of course the hospital was full, so We had to wait . For a week ! I had discovered by now that hospitals suck. I was informed that I would need open heart surgery but would have to wait. The hospital sent me home and put me on warfarin (rat poison), which is a blood thinner given to heart patients all the time. So, I waited. and waited. For 3 months.

On the night of november 15 I went to bed with a sore stomach. The cramps just got worse and worse. Finally, at 4 am I had enough and called 911. In hindsight that was my big mistake! Turns out you have to be off warfarin for at least a week before major surgery. Major faux pas. As in bad idea…the doctors later apologized. Okay, enough for now. Stay tuned for chapter two, I will show you Claire’s diary, and my parents’ emails.

by John W. McGraw, Jr.

Do you want to increase your sales and add to your company’s revenue? Of course you do (that is probably the main reason you became a sales professional to begin with).

Keep in mind, you can’t make someone buy something they don’t want (even though that seems to be the universal fear from the general population, regarding sales people), so you have develop a need in their mind, for what you are selling. One of the best ways to increase your sales results, is to increase the amount of probing you do. The more you know about what your customer is looking for, the more you can tailor you sales pitch to their needs.

What is Probing?
It is simply asking questions of your potential customer, to find out what they are doing now, or how they use a certain product, or what they like about a product, or what they would change about a product. Any questions that get them to open up and start a discussion, so that you can learn as much as possible about how to position your product for them, in the best way possible. The more questions you can ask, the better chance you will uncover problems they are having with their present product or system. When you uncover a problem, then you have just had them develop a need in their mind. If your product can fill that need, you have a great chance to make a sale!

Asking questions is the best way to gain the knowledge of what is most important to them, but make sure to ask as many open-ended questions (questions that can’t be answered by a simple yes or no response) as possible. For instance: Instead of asking if they like the widget that they are presently using, ask what they like about it, or ask what changes they would like to make, that would make it function better for them. If a customer tells you that they would change the color from red to green, for instance, and your product is green, than you have the perfect entry to show your green product and make the sale. Of course, it probably won’t be that simple, but you don’t know their hot buttons until you Probe.

There are numerous reasons that someone buys something; price, quality, status, desire, can’t get from present supplier, like the rep, company reputation (the list can go on and on), but unless you ask your customers probing questions, you aren’t going to uncover what is important to them (unless you stumble across something inadvertently).

Probing includes listening skills.

Keep in mind that asking Probing questions is great, but it won’t mean anything unless you listen to your potential customer’s answers. Make sure to give your customer time to answer before you jump in with a solution to their problems. That is a common mistake for sales people to want to show how good their product is, but by careful listening, and waiting, you might uncover other needs that you can address, also.

You probably aren’t going to be able to fill a need each time you talk to a potential customer, but by utilizing Probing questions, you have increased your chances of making a sale exponentially.

About the Author

John W. McGraw has been a successful sales representative, consultant, and business owner in the Medical Industry for over 25 years. He has sold for some of the most prestigious companies in the industry (including GE Medical, Roche, Pfizer-owned Schneider, and Instrumentation Laboratory) achieving top rankings, President’s Club status, and exceeding sales quotas. Mr. McGraw has consistently made a positive impact on countless patient’s lives with the quality products and services that he has sold to world renown Hospitals. In passing on his considerable knowledge to others, Mr. McGraw hopes he can help them be more successful in their professional careers.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=John_W._McGraw,_Jr.


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